Resources

Welcome to our resources search page. Please use the drop down menu to find recent Waterwise research and reports. This website also hosts the Water Efficiency Evidence Database, which is a repository of key research reports and paid for by UK water companies to support research and innovation.

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Improving Uptake in Home Visit Retrofit Programmes (2012)

This report by Waterwise sets out to better understand the factors influencing the uptake of home visit and home retrofit projects and reviews recruitment methods that were deployed successfully and unsuccessfully in previous programmes. Evidence was collected through a literature review focusing on information available for the UK and phone interviews with people closely involved in the recruitment process. The research elicited crucial insights about common methods including letters, phone calls, and door-knocking, when, where and how to use them, but also identified knowledge gaps for future research.

For the full article click here.

Green Deal Guidance for the Water Sector (2012)

This guidance was developed by Waterwise and the Energy Saving Trust to help increase and simplify the delivery of joint energy and water efficiency programmes, through partnerships working between water companies and energy efficiency programme providers. This includes the Green Deal, ECO and other local authority energy efficiency/fuel poverty-led in-home schemes. The guidance addresses aspects of how to design effective water and energy partnerships, which devices to install when, how to engage and advice customers, and information on expected water, energy, and money savings.

For the full article click here.

Saving Water in Educational Facilities (2012)

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This document provides advice on water saving in educational facilities, in the context of the USA. It is produced by the WaterSense

For the full article click here.

The Case for Water Efficiency (2012)

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This position paper describes the role of water efficiency in urban water use in Australia and identifies emerging issues. Designated for decision-makers and policy developers, it presents the case for consideration of water efficient policies and practices. Whilst reference is made to operational efficiency including leakage control and water management policies and practices, it is directed primarily at water efficiency at the point of use.

For the full article click here.

How to Manage Change and Improve Water Efficiency

WRAP

WRAP has produced this easy-to-use handbook to help food and drink companies establish changes that improve their water efficiency. This handbook covers two key areas that will help facilitate behaviour changes within your business: understanding and challenging behavioural inertia; and identifying the ingredients for success: – drivers for change: senior management commitment is essential; – clear and shared vision: staff at all levels should be on board; – capacity for change: providing the resources, time and budget to deliver your desired outcome; and – prioritise action: using the ’plan-do-check-review’ approach and ensuring that you keep communication routes open.

For the full article click here.

An evaluation of the Plug In water saving project (2012)

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This report investigates the Plug In Water Saving Project, which aimed at installing water saving measures in social housing in the East and West Midlands, and to promote behavioural change among residents. Set up by the Environment Agency and several partners, the project engaged seven social housing providers and their residents in water-saving activities on a larger scale than previous projects. More than three and a half thousand measures have been installed in approximately three and a half thousand homes up between 2011 and 2012.

For the full article click here.

Lydd Retrofit Trial Report (DRAFT) (2012)

This report analyses a water-efficiency retrofit trial from 2009, which Veolia Water South East carried out as part of its metering trial activities and compulsory metering programme in the town of Lydd. Its main goal was to understand customer’s perceptions around various aspects of implementing retrofit programmes through four focus groups. 1,450 households were invited by phone call, of which participated 250 in the trial. 43 % of the 163 successfully interviewed post-trial indicated having had a positive experience with the water-saving devices. The majority believed water savings were low and that they reduced their bill “a little”, £4.26 on average.

For the full article click here.

Water Sector Report Climate Change Risk Assessment (2012)

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The purpose of the first Climate Change Risk Assessment (CCRA) was to assess the key risks and opportunities facing the UK from climate change to the year 2100. The CCRA is required by the Climate Change Act 2008 and will be completed every five years. This Water Sector Report is one of 11 Sector Reports and is a key step in the process of developing the evidence base for the CCRA. The analysis described in this report covers three themes: pressures on water availability, water quality, and the deterioration of water company assets.

For the full article click here.

United Utilities Home Audit Project

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This report brings together findings from a trial carried out by United Utilities in 2006-2007 that investigated the effectiveness of water-efficient devices. 4,642 domestic properties in Warrington were sent an invitation. 393 took part in the audit and received a ‘water savers pack’, which included a basic shower timer and information on saving water. Further devices were installed where appropriate including water efficient showerheads, dual flush retrofit and save-a-flush cistern displacement devices. 67 % of 211 measured households were able to save water, on average 20.6 litres per property per day, which represents a reduction in water use of 6.8%.

For the full article click here.

Freshwater Availability and Use in the UK (2011)

WRAP

The study identifies those industrial and commercial sectors and regions of the UK where water use is high, where there is scope for significant reductions in water use and where environmental pressures on water use are greatest. This study sought to complete a water mass balance for each region and sector in order that non-household sectors that are major consumers of water could be identified. All types of observations through CAMS (Catchment Abstraction Management Strategies), WEI (Water Exploitation Index) and other water stress indicators show that much of south-east England and East Anglia is currently, and will continue to be the most water-stressed area of the UK, although there are a number of very localised areas elsewhere which are already over-abstracted. These have been identified as short term priority locations.

For the full article click here.
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